Death by Sweet Tea


The words you said
over lemons and sweet tea
have cut out my heart.
Casually, you take
the fruit in your hand,
unmindful of the blood,
“Well, bless your heart…”
If possible, you are more
sugared than the tea
(if possible).
Heart-free, I consider:
I never was much of
a southern lady.


This is a Magpie Tale. Please head over there to read other tales. I am also linking it to One Shot Wednesday. You should read the poems at that site too!

P.S. I had mentioned to a few people yesterday that I was planning on doing something funny with the prompt, just to be obstinate. I'm fairly certain that the above effort is NOT funny. Sorry!

Comments

  1. LOL! Oh, I think it's funny, alright, perhaps because I know exactly where it's coming from :-D

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  2. Not funny. Very good though.

    What does Mr Linthead know that we don't?

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  3. Hmm - well, I think he might know something I don't because this is fictional. HOWEVER, we both know that "bless her heart" isn't really a blessing in the south, so maybe that's it :)

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  4. I never was much of a southern lady.

    - great line, lovely piece.

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  5. I lived in Arkansas for 6 years and the "Bless Her Heart" always got to me.

    Great poem.

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  6. The lemon in the image most certainly makes me think this wound will sting.

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  7. In the American South, killing with kindness has multiple meanings. Sometimes it really is heaping kindnesses on an enemy to shame her into submission. Sometimes, the last words one hears are "Bless your heart" as the dirk slips between the ribs. But that's not what made me laugh out loud. It was the sheer honesty of this piece of "fiction" my dear spouse.

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  8. Kinda funny. You're always giving disclaimers in your poems and they add a real sincerity and honesty to them.

    "Bless her heart" was a perfect line, and "Heart-free" - brilliant!

    Kat

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  9. The 3 opening lines are megga. They set it all beautifully, very clever use of the prompt and wonderful character and drama within these words.

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  10. Well bless your heart ( :-)

    Really this is excellent
    I could see it as the opening lines to a novel....
    I have never experienced such southern charm....
    but you have given me a taste
    good one

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  11. I think sweet words can be the ultimate manipulation..this is so smooth..as they say..if words could kill...

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  12. Concise, succinct - shades of Katherine Mansfield it seems to me. She was a wordsmith of great skill whom I love.
    I loved your words, Dana.

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  13. Oh, I can relate to this one. It goes along very nicely with mine. I never was much of a southern lady, either.

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  14. Is 'bless your heart' a bad thing? I say that all the time. ;)

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  15. Well, it often means you're doing ok for the shape that you're in - in other words it's sweet how hard you're working. Or isn't it cute how she tries to be fashionable? It's definitely a southern lady way of putting someone down.

    On the other hand it can mean just that - bless your heart - probably depends on the tone of voice.

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  16. Have another go for the really funny one that is still haunting you!
    I like this.

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  17. If possible, you are more
    sugared than the tea


    I think we've all met our share of people like this!

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  18. lol...i hate it when people say "bless your heart..." and think they can add whatever crap they want to unload on you...

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  19. That photograph is without a doubt the best illustration of a poem that I have seen in quite a while. Fantastic! It is perfect!

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  20. Sweet tea and southern women... I don't really get it. I like my tea strong and earthy. Guess that's the kind of woman I AM, too!
    By the way~ glad you stopped by my place and glad I came here, too!

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  21. Beautifully done! Love the placement of the 'Bless your heart', perfectly timed.

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  22. What a great take ... words can be more bloody than a knife for sure...bkm

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  23. Oh my, does this bring back memories of Atlanta, Georgia! Those 'ladies' really know how to belle someone, don't they? And you know, there are times, when "I just have no other recourse" but to belle someone up here in Yankeeland. Shhhh... they haven't a clue what I've just done. It's evil; I know, but sometimes so worth it.

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